Posts Tagged ‘Nikon D300’

Nikon Digital Day At Unique Photo 4/18 – 4/19

April 17, 2009

If you are passionate about photography and intrigued by high-end technology, We are hosting 3 Nikon classes on Saturday April 18th and Sunday April 19th. Join Christopher Knapp, Nikon’s North Eastern Technical Representative at the newly expanded Unique University (located in the Unique Photo Superstore) and learn about the latest digital imaging and flash technologies.

The Nikon D300 and Nikon D90 will be featured as students will see and learn hands on the power and features of two of Nikon’s finest DSLR cameras. Learn how to control light with built-in wireless flash capabilities and then enhance your images right in the camera with the new retouching menu. Groundbreaking features, including Live View, a cinematic-quality 24-fps D-Movie Mode (D90) it is easy to spark the creativity of anyone looking to make incredible images.

Learning about your Nikon Digital SLR is only the first step in taking great pictures; To “Create better Pictures” you need to learn to use other photographic equipment with your Nikon DSLR. Christopher Knapp will be presenting a “Creative Lighting Techniques” seminar using Nikon Speedlights that can be controlled right from your camera using Nikon’s “Commander” mode. This class will teach the importance and art of balancing your ambient and on-camera flash.

With Each class has a registration you will receive a $10 gift card that can be used at the Unique Photo’s SuperStore

Click Here Or Images Above To Register

Unique University Class Schedule + Nikon Days Coming Soon

April 6, 2009

uucreatebetterpictures

nikondays

Understanding Your Digital SLR Camera III (Composition)
4/7/09 (Tuesday)  6pm-8pm  $45
Knowing all the science and mathematics behind
photography can only take you so far. The art of photography is 90
percent seeing and 10 percent photographing. Students will learn in
this class the vital aspects and rules of image composition and
graphic design as they apply to taking photographs.
Our professional staff will go over the basics such as the rule of thirds,
perspective, horizontal vs. vertical orientation, designing a photograph
to assist you in developing your own personal style and vision.

Understanding Your Digital SLR Camera III (Composition)

4/8/09 (Wednesday)  11am-1pm  $45
Knowing all the science and mathematics behind
photography can only take you so far. The art of photography is 90
percent seeing and 10 percent photographing. Students will learn in
this class the vital aspects and rules of image composition and
graphic design as they apply to taking photographs.
Our professional staff will go over the basics such as the rule of thirds,
perspective, horizontal vs. vertical orientation, designing a photograph
to assist you in developing your own personal style and vision.

Unique Photo · 123 US Hwy 46 (west) · Fairfield, NJ 07004

Tel: 973-377-2007 · www.uniquephoto.com

We’re All About You, Since 1947®

Tracking Fast Moving Subjects

October 29, 2008

This past summer, I acquired a Nikon D300 DSLR to use for action photography. Using the new autofocus system built into this camera, my percentage of sharp and in focus images of fast moving subjects has drastically increased.

As most of you know, I spend a lot of time shooting nature and wildlife. Last week, I traveled to Brigantine National Wildlife Refuge in NJ to photograph waterfowl and wading birds. As usual when visiting this refuge, I came home with some very nice wildlife portraits using my 500mm lens. In addition to the 500mm, I worked with my 70-200 2.8 AFS VR lens to capture some action shots.

The D300 with the 70-200mm AFS VR (with and without the TC14E 1.4 converter attached) is a killer combination for action photography. With the 1.5 crop factor applied, the 70-200 2.8 becomes a 100-300 2.8 (150 – 450mm f4 with the 1.4).

In order to capture action shots, I set my camera to the continuous focusing mode and select the 51 point autofocusing option. In my experience, the 51 point option works best for action photography of birds and waterfowl. My technique is to allow the camera’s AF system to lock onto a target while the subject is some distance away and select the left AF point placing it on the subject’s head. This technique assures good composition and allows the camera to track the target accurately.

Don’t expect to produce tack sharp and in focus images of fast moving subjects 100% of the time even with the latest technology. It takes a lot of practice and experience using these systems before you can ever get anywhere close to this number.

A few of the images I made on this trip are presented below:

Night Heron in Flight

Snowy Egret in Flight