Posts Tagged ‘Add new tag’

Canon USA & Pro Football Hall Of Fame Awards the “Why Do You Love Football?” Super Bowl Contest Winners

January 28, 2009

LAKE SUCCESS, N.Y., January 28, 2009 – Canon U.S.A., Inc., a leader in digital imaging, today announced that Stuart Steele, 47, of Kansas and Ben Queen, 13, of West Virginia have been named the winners of the Adult and Teen Divisions of the Canon and Pro Football Hall of Fame “Why Do You Love Football?” photo challenge, respectively. Each has won a trip for four to attend Super Bowl XLIII in Tampa Bay, Fla. where their winning photos will be displayed at the NFL Experience, the most exciting continuous event surrounding Super Bowl XLIII. NFL Experience is located adjacent to Raymond James Stadium the week leading up to Super Bowl XLIII. Additionally, both have won a trip for four to the 2009 Pro Football Hall of Fame Enshrinement Celebration in August where their winning photos will be unveiled and on display for a full year in the Hall of Fame.

This is the fourth year of the nationwide photo contest in which one Grand Prize winner from each division was selected. Fans could enter their photos in two categories, “Action” and “Feature.” This photo contest allowed football and photography fans the opportunity to capture the passion and excitement of youth football by submitting photos of everything from a playful catch in the backyard to any youth, school or organized football game.

Canon Official Press Release

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Wood Floats

January 13, 2009

 

 

“The law of floatation was not discovered by the contemplating the sinking of things, but by contemplating the floating of things which floated naturally, and then intelligently asking why they did so.”  -Thomas Troward

 

Professor Downey

Professor Downey

 

Its funny but true, in the early days of shipbuilding, ships were made of wood because wood floats and iron sinks.  Today ships all over the world are built of iron.  It was discovered that anything could float if it’s lighter than the mass of liquid it displaces.

 

Imagine the problems you could solve, the hurdles that you could overcome, if you spent more time contemplating the solution rather than the problem.  

 

Do you have a photo problem?  (Or any kind of problem) Steal a page from the book of “Seven Habits of Highly Effective People” and begin with the end in mind.  Contemplate how you want it to look in the end.

Trip to Jim Thorpe, PA

August 27, 2008

I spent three very enjoyable days (August 21-24) on a photography and mountain biking trip to Jim Thorpe, Pennsylvania. Jim Thorpe is a very small town (named after the famous athlete) located in the Western Pocono Mountains, approximately 2.5 hours from New York City.

I went to Jim Thorpe with the intention of photographing a 25 mile organized bike trip I was making through the Lehigh Gorge. As it turned out, the biking was fantastic but the photography was poor due to the very bright harsh sunlight encountered on the day of our trip. Since light is everything in photography, I packed my camera in my Lowe-Pro Slingshot bag and left it there unused for the entire 5 hour ride. I could have tried using a polarizing filter to cut glare or made images in the shade, or used fill flash to shoot portraits but decided against these options preferring to enjoy the beautiful scenery and bike ride instead.

One important aspect of photography I have learned over the years is knowing when to shoot and when not to. I will rarely if ever, photograph in bad light even when presented with a good subject. It’s just not worth it.

I spent the next two days in Jim Thorpe photographing architecture and old trains very early in the day and again in the late afternoons and early evenings. I carried with me my Nikon D300 with the new Nikon 16-85mm f3.5-5.6 ED VR lens. I really liked using this lens. I found it equally as sharp and much lighter in weight than my professional 17-55 2.8 ED zoom when stopped down to an aperture of f8. There is some barrel distortion that shows up at the 16 to 24mm settings which affected some my architectural photos but this is a normal phenomenon common to most consumer and some professional grade zoom lenses. The Vibration Reduction feature built into the 16-85 was a godsend and worked as advertised allowing me to shoot at 3 stops below the recommended minimum shutter speed of 1/focal length for hand-holding. With VR activated, I was able to shoot down to 1/15 sec. and obtain sharp photos.

If you are an outdoors oriented individual and enjoy bike riding, hiking, historical sites, fishing, scenic drives and photography, a visit to the town of Jim Thorpe will be worth the time and expense.

A few examples of the images I made on this trip are presented below: